Population Characteristics within the Portland-Vancouver MSA
Webb Sprague, Emily Picha, Sheila Martin
Institute of Metropolitan Studies, PSU
May 2010

Figure 1. Map of Portland MSA PUMAs and Cities [1]

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey.[2]

Within the Portland region, certain population characteristics such as age, race, ethnicity, education, income, and language vary from area to area. Broad region and city level statistics do not capture these differences, and because the Census occurs only every 10 years, the data we do have at smaller geographies quickly becomes outdated.

In this article, we will explore population characteristics in different parts of the Portland MSA using Census Public Use Microsample (PUMS) data from 2005-2007. For the spatial component, we will use a Census-defined small area geography called Public Use Microsample Area (PUMA), designed to follow existing county boundaries and contain around 100,000 people.[3]

We will sometimes focus on a couple of example PUMAs to show the interesting differences within the region.[4] See Table 1 for a description of each PUMA, and Figures 1 and 2 for a map of the PUMAs.

Highlights

  • High rates of fertility in certain areas of the region have led to a natural increase in population and a lower median age. Consequently, there are stark differences in age structures between different parts of the region.
  • Portland has a larger proportion of the population between the ages of 25 and 59 than the United States as a whole, but a lower percentage of the population over 70 years old.
  • Household composition varies throughout the Portland MSA, with urban neighborhoods having lower household sizes and suburban areas having higher household sizes.
  • Over 50% of the total black population is concentrated in just three PUMAs, whereas the Hispanic population is more dispersed.
  • In all Portland MSA PUMAs, at least 10% of households speak a language other than English in the home. In some PUMAs, over 25% of the population speaks a language other than English at home.
  • Varying age structures within the region may drive some income distribution variation: younger college-educated people who have not yet entered their prime earning years might contribute to lower incomes in some parts of Portland.
  • However, some PUMAs have a lower percentage of the population with Bachelor’s degrees, which may contribute to lower incomes in these PUMAs.

Figure 2. Map of Portland MSA PUMAs

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey.

Table 1. Table of PUMAs with Descriptions

PUMA Description
1301 North/Northeast Portland
1302 Outer East Portland
1303 Southeast Portland
1304 West Portland
1305 Central East Portland
1306 Gresham/East Multnomah County
1307 East Clackamas County
1308 Northwest Clackamas County
1309 West Clackamas County
1310 Tigard/Tualatin/Wilsonville
1311 Hillsboro/Western Washington County
1312 Aloha/West Beaverton
1313 East and Central Beaverton
2101 North Clark County
2102 East Clark County
2200 Vancouver

1. Age Composition

In the Portland MSA, fertility and migration have been the main factors contributing to the regional differences in age structure. High rates of fertility in certain areas of the region have led to a natural increase in population and a lower median age. Mortality is generally low and stable in the Portland MSA and contributes little to the differences between age pyramids. The age structure of a population affects demand for schools, health care, recreation, entertainment, and shopping. It also affects taxable income and the supply of labor.

In contrast to the influence of fertility on age composition, migration is more complex because most migrants move during key life transitions such as in their twenties and early thirties or after retirement. Young migrants contribute to an overall younger age structure in the short term, but without new migrants, in the long term they age with the rest of the population and contribute to a higher median age.

Figure 3 and Table 2 display the age composition of the United States and the Portland MSA. Portland has a larger proportion of the population between the ages of 25 and 59 than the United States as a whole, but a lower percentage of the population over 70 years old. Since the Portland MSA has not experienced high levels of retiree in-migration, older migrants have not had a large effect on the age structure in this region.

Figure 3. Age of Population in the Portland MSA and USA


Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey 2005-2007.

Table 2. Age of Population in the Portland MSA and USA

United States Portland MSA
0-4 6.9% 6.7%
5-9 6.6% 6.9%
10-14 6.9% 6.7%
15-19 3.7% 3.4%
20-24 3.6% 3.1%
25-29 6.8% 7.5%
30-34 6.6% 7.4%
35-39 7.1% 7.9%
40-44 7.5% 7.4%
45-49 7.6% 7.8%
50-54 6.9% 7.5%
55-59 6.0% 6.7%
60-64 2.2% 2.2%
65-69 1.6% 1.5%
70-74 2.9% 2.3%
75-79 2.5% 1.9%
80-84 1.9% 1.5%
85 1.7% 1.6%

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey 2005-2007.

There are significant variations in age structures within the Portland MSA. This variation is due to different parts of the Portland MSA having relatively large concentrations of certain age groups. Figures 5-7 display age pyramids for three PUMAs with contrasting age structures in the Portland MSA.

  • West Portland (1304) has many older adults, because it is a wealthier and older population, probably with a lot of empty nesters and older singles. (Figure 4)
  • Southeast Portland (1305) has many young adults and young children living in more established neighborhoods. (Figure 5)
  • Tigard/Tualatin/Wilsonville (1310) has many young and middle-aged families with children living in suburban neighborhoods because of the bulges at parent and child ages. (Figure 6)

Figure 4. Age Pyramid for West Portland (1304) (click to enlarge)

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey. 2005-2007 PUMS data.

Figure 6. Age Pyramid for Tigard/Tualatin/Wilsonville (1310) (click to enlarge)

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey. 2005-2007 PUMS data.

Figure 5. Age Pyramid for Southeast Portland (1305) (click to enlarge)

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey. 2005-2007 PUMS data.

Figure 7. Median Age by PUMA in the Portland MSA (click to enlarge)

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey. 2005-2007 PUMS data.

This data can have important policy implications. For example, in Hillsboro/Western Washington County (1311), school-aged children represent 28% of the total population, so school services may be very important to the local population. School services may be less important in West Portland (1304) or Southeast Portland (1305), where only 17% and 19% of the population respectively is school-aged.

The median age for the Portland MSA is 38, compared to a median age of 41 for Oregon. We can also see that no single area in the Portland MSA predominates as a destination for people over 65. Median age can shift either due to the presence of older people or due to the absence of younger people. Figure 7 shows the distribution of median age around the region. Table 3 in the appendix provides detailed information about the median age and the percent in each age category in the Portland MSA and in each PUMA.

2. Household Composition

Household composition varies throughout the Portland MSA, with urban neighborhoods having lower household sizes and suburban areas having higher household sizes.[5] The average household size is higher in areas with lots of large families and lower in areas with smaller families and more single people. Smaller households are typically comprised of people in their twenties or older than their forties when the children have left. Additionally, more educated people tend to have fewer children and smaller households overall.

Household composition has huge ramifications for the region as a whole. Households provide the setting for the raising of new members of society, their socialization, psychological development, and education. They also often function as the basic economic unit, in that households typically pool expenses and resources.[6] In areas with small household sizes, more housing units are required to house the same population.

As an example of the difference in household composition between PUMAs, consider that West Portland (1304) has an older population with fewer children. In this PUMA, about 43% of the households have only one person per household and average household size is 1.85 people. In suburban Hillsboro/Western Washington County (1311), the number of single-person households is only 21% and the average household size is 2.67 people. Figure 8 shows the distribution of household size in the region by PUMA. Table 4 in the appendix shows the percentage of households in various sizes.

Figure 8. Persons per Household (click to enlarge)

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey. 2005-2007 PUMS data.

3. Race and Hispanic origin

Race and ethnicity also varies somewhat throughout the Portland MSA. Table 4 shows race by PUMA. Figure 9 shows the distribution of the black population, figure 10 shows the distribution of the Asian population, and figure 11 shows the regional distribution of the Hispanic population. Tables 5-7 in the appendix gives detailed information about population distribution of different racial and ethnic groups in the Portland MSA.

The following are findings from the demographic analysis of PUMS data:

  • Over 50% of the total Portland MSA black population is concentrated in just three PUMAs – North/Northeast Portland (1301), Outer East Portland (1302), and Central East Portland (1305).
  • The Hispanic/Latino population is distributed throughout the Portland MSA, with especially high concentrations North/Northeast Portland (1301), Outer East Portland (1302), Gresham/East Multnomah County (1306), Tigard/Tualatin/Wilsonville (1310), Hillsboro/Western Washington County (1311), and East and Central Beaverton (1313).
  • Aloha/West Beaverton (1312) and Outer East Portland (1302) both have a large Asian population.
    • In particular, Aloha/West Beaverton (1312) has a large Korean population.
    • Outer East Portland (1302) has a large Vietnamese and Chinese population.
    • North/Northeast Portland (1301) has a relatively large population of people claiming two or more races.

Figure 9. Percent Black by PUMA (click to enlarge)

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey. 2005-2007 PUMS data.

Figure 10. Percent Hispanic by PUMA (click to enlarge)

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey. 2005-2007 PUMS data.

Figure 11. Percent Asian by PUMA (click to enlarge)

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey. 2005-2007 PUMS data.

4. Language

In all Portland MSA PUMAs, at least 10% of households speak a language other than English in the home. Hillsboro/Western Washington (1311) and Aloha/Outer East Beaverton have the highest number of non-English speaking households, 21.5% and 25.6% respectively. East Clackamas County has just 9.3% of households speak a language other than English. In Outer East Portland (1302) and Aloha/West Beaverton (1312), there are many Asian language speakers, and many Spanish speakers in the East Portland PUMAs as well as outer Clackamas and Washington counties. Table 8 in the appendix provides detailed data on household language by PUMA.

Figure 12. Percent of Non-English Language Households in the Portland MSA, by Language and PUMA

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey. 2005-2007 PUMS data.

5. Income

Income is distributed unevenly among PUMAs in the Portland MSA. Figure 13 shows median household income (MHI) by PUMA. West Clackamas County (1309) has the highest median household income in the Portland MSA, $73,218. Southeast Portland (1305) and Outer East Portland (1309) have lower median household income of $42,844 and $43,500 respectively. Different age structures in different PUMAs may drive some income distribution variation: younger college-educated people who have not yet entered their prime earning years might contribute to lower incomes in North/Northeast Portland, Southeast Portland, and Outer East Portland. Table 9 in the appendix provides median household income data for each PUMA.

Figure 13. Median Household Income by PUMA (click to enlarge)

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey. 2005-2007 PUMS data.

6. Education

Education varies within the Portland MSA, since some  Tidlig på fjoråret var det store reaksjoner i norske mediaer når store norske sportsprofiler som Zuccarello, John Arne Riise, John Carew og Nortaug signerte avtaler med betting-selskaper på nett, deriblant Betsson, Vera John og Come On Casino . PUMAs have over double the number of bachelor’s degrees as a percent of the population. The percentage of Portland MSA residents with a bachelor’s degree is 32%. West Portland (1304) stands out as a particularly highly educated PUMA, at almost twice the regional ratio of bachelor’s degrees. Even though median household incomes are low, Central East Portland (1305) has high education rates, which may be due to the influx of educated young adults who have not yet advanced far in their careers. Not surprisingly, wealthier areas of Clackamas and Washington Counties (1309, 1312, 1313) have high educational levels as well. Figure 14 shows the percent of the population with at least a bachelor’s degree in the Portland MSA by PUMA. Table 10 in the appendix gives educational attainment levels by PUMA.

Figure 14. Percent BA by PUMA (click to enlarge)

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey. 2005-2007 PUMS data.

Conclusion

This article aimed to describe basic demographic features that make living in certain parts of the Portland MSA unique, but which may not be apparent unless we zoom into the smaller geographies. Furthermore, more nuanced knowledge of regional demographics is crucial to efforts to improve livability in the region, from addressing spatial inequalities in income and education, to planning for age- and lifestyle-specific services like schools or retirement centers, and for understanding the impact of economic development on employment, population, and housing.

Data Sources

For subregional analysis, we use the Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) releases of the American Community Survey (ACS), a subset of individual and household survey responses collected during the administration of the ACS.[7] Because it shows proportions of large populations, it should be accurate.

We base our geographical analysis on Public Use Microsample Areas (PUMA) geographies, which are census-designated areas that each contain a population of about 100,000 people and do not overlap.[8] PUMAs give more fine-grained information on population characteristics than city or county level geographies.

Glossary

Age Structure. “Age structure” refers to how the population is distributed over the various ages. In a population with an older age structure, there might be more 65 to 70 year olds than there are 5 to 10 year olds; this structure would be found in areas with high numbers of retirees. If a region is experiencing high fertility it will usually have a younger age structure, with larger numbers of 5 to 10 year olds than 65 to 70 year olds. Population pyramids provide a visualization of age structure.

PUMA. A PUMA (Public Use Microdata Area) is a region designed to contain about 100,000 people at the 2000 Census, and is the level of geography specified in the one and three year pooled PUMS data. The Census Bureau withholds finer grained detail regarding location in order to protect the confidentiality of the survey respondents; otherwise, an analyst might be able to learn private details about a person and find that person through the PUMS data.

PUMS Data. PUMS (Public Use Microdata Sample) data are a copy of about half of the individual responses to the ACS questionnaire, along with some other variables added by the Census Bureau. These data allow us to create custom analyses, rather than rely on tabulations made by the Census Bureau.

Rate. A “rate” is a measure of how often an even happens for each unit of “exposure.” Exposure, in turn, refers to how many people are alive for a year. In order to calculate the mortality rate in 2006, for example, we would divide the number of deaths in the year by the number of people alive in the same year. We can calculate rates for many different events, including migration, fertility, marriage, etc.

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank Vivian Siu, Nancy Hales, Charles Rynerson, Sarah Iannarone, Emily Renfrow, and Lisa Yarbrough for their many helpful comments. Any errors are the responsibility of the authors.

References

Hough, George C. 2006. “An evaluation of the American Community Survey: results from the Oregon test site”. Population research and policy review (0167-5923), 25 (3), p. 257.

Institute of Metropolitan Studies, Portland State University. 2007. “The Metropolitan Briefing Book.”

Office of Economic Analysis, Department of Administrative Services, State of Oregon. 2009. “Oregon Economic and Revenue Forecast.”

Oregon Department of Health Services. 2006. “Oregon Vital Statistics Annual Report.” http://www.dhs.state.or.us/dhs/ph/chs/data/annrep.shtml (accessed October 1, 2009).

Oregon Employment Department. 2008. “Oregon Labor Market Information Service (OLMIS).” http://www.qualityinfo.org/olmisj/OlmisZine (accessed October 1, 2009).

Population Research Center, Portland State University. 2008. “Oregon Population Report.” http://www.pdx.edu/sites/www.pdx.edu.prc/files/media_assets/PopRpt08c2.pdf (accessed October 1, 2009).

US Census Bureau. 2008. “American Community Survey.” http://www.census.gov/acs/www/ (accessed October 1, 2009).

Warren, Robert. 2009. “Provisional unpublished estimates provided by Robert Warren, July 2009.”

Washington Office of Financial Management. 2009. “April 1, 2009 Population Estimates.”

Appendix

Table 3. Percentage Population by Age and PUMA in the Portland-Vancouver MSA (Jump back)

PUMA Name 0-6 7-18 19-25 26-35 36-50 51-65 66 Median
Age
1301 North/Northeast Portland 10.5% 13.0% 9.6% 18.6% 24.6% 15.7% 8.0% 36
1302 Outer East Portland 11.1% 17.2% 7.6% 13.2% 22.6% 16.5% 11.9% 39
1303 Southeast Portland 9.8% 13.7% 9.2% 17.3% 24.0% 17.7% 8.3% 36
1304 West Portland 5.7% 11.1% 10.2% 14.8% 24.0% 23.4% 11.0% 42
1305 Central East Portland 8.9% 10.8% 6.6% 19.8% 25.3% 18.4% 10.2% 38
1306 Gresham/East Multnomah County 10.8% 18.9% 7.9% 14.4% 21.0% 17.6% 9.4% 36
1307 East Clackamas County 8.9% 16.4% 7.1% 11.7% 23.3% 22.8% 9.9% 42
1308 Northwest Clackamas County 8.4% 15.9% 10.1% 13.8% 21.9% 18.7% 11.2% 41
1309 West Clackamas County 8.4% 17.0% 8.3% 11.4% 22.9% 21.5% 10.6% 41
1310 Tigard/Tualatin/Wilsonville 10.2% 15.1% 8.3% 15.8% 23.1% 17.1% 10.5% 38
1311 Hillsboro/Western Washington County 11.2% 16.4% 9.3% 16.9% 23.0% 15.3% 8.0% 35
1312 Aloha/West Beaverton 11.4% 18.9% 7.6% 15.7% 25.3% 14.8% 6.4% 35
1313 East and Central Beaverton 8.2% 15.3% 8.1% 16.3% 21.4% 20.5% 10.1% 39
2101 North Clark County 10.2% 17.9% 7.8% 15.6% 21.5% 17.4% 9.6% 37
2102 East Clark County 9.9% 20.7% 8.5% 13.0% 23.9% 16.3% 7.6% 37
2200 Vancouver 9.8% 15.3% 10.1% 16.3% 20.7% 16.9% 11.0% 37
Portland MSA 9.7% 16.0% 8.6% 15.2% 23.0% 18.0% 9.6% 38

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey. 2005-2007 PUMS data.

Table 4. Percentage Households by Size and PUMA in the Portland-Vancouver MSA (Jump back)

PUMA Name Vacant Housing Unit 1 Person 2 People 3 People 4 People 5 People Average Household Size
1301 North/Northeast Portland 6.4% 30.0% 34.0% 14.5% 9.1% 6.1% 2.25
1302 Outer East Portland 6.5% 28.4% 27.4% 16.6% 10.7% 10.4% 2.49
1303 Southeast Portland 5.4% 32.2% 32.0% 12.9% 11.0% 6.6% 2.28
1304 West Portland 7.6% 43.7% 29.2% 9.8% 6.9% 2.8% 1.85
1305 Central East Portland 6.7% 38.5% 31.0% 12.6% 8.1% 3.1% 2.02
1306 Gresham/East Multnomah County 6.1% 23.3% 32.4% 14.9% 12.8% 10.6% 2.61
1307 East Clackamas County 8.1% 17.6% 37.0% 14.6% 14.0% 8.6% 2.60
1308 Northwest Clackamas County 6.2% 27.0% 30.7% 16.7% 12.5% 6.9% 2.45
1309 West Clackamas County 6.5% 22.7% 34.4% 14.5% 13.5% 8.5% 2.52
1310 Tigard/Tualatin/Wilsonville 4.3% 26.2% 33.8% 13.8% 14.5% 7.4% 2.48
1311 Hillsboro/Western Washington County 6.1% 20.9% 33.1% 15.3% 13.7% 11.0% 2.67
1312 Aloha/West Beaverton 6.3% 21.6% 28.4% 16.2% 16.2% 11.4% 2.65
1313 East and Central Beaverton 7.0% 30.5% 32.1% 12.4% 11.7% 6.2% 2.28
2101 North Clark County 4.8% 19.7% 33.7% 16.7% 14.8% 10.4% 2.67
2102 East Clark County 5.3% 14.4% 32.3% 16.5% 17.9% 13.6% 2.96
2200 Vancouver 6.0% 30.8% 31.1% 13.9% 10.9% 7.3% 2.37
ALL PDX 6.2% 27.1% 31.9% 14.4% 12.3% 8.1% 2.44

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey. 2005-2007 PUMS data.

Table 5. Percentage of Population by Race and PUMA in the Portland-Vancouver MSA (Jump back)

PUMA Name White Black American Indian Asian Pacific Islander Other race 2 races
1301 North/Northeast Portland 70.5% 14.8% 1.6% 3.1% 0.4% 3.4% 6.1%
1302 Outer East Portland 70.8% 8.4% 3.2% 9.8% 0.5% 3.4% 4.0%
1303 Southeast Portland 81.8% 2.2% 1.0% 7.5% 0.8% 2.7% 3.9%
1304 West Portland 88.6% 2.4% 0.6% 5.0% 0.0% 1.6% 1.9%
1305 Central East Portland 83.2% 5.4% 0.4% 5.7% 0.3% 1.8% 3.1%
1306 Gresham/East Multnomah County 80.8% 3.9% 3.3% 5.6% 0.3% 3.5% 2.6%
1307 East Clackamas County 92.3% 0.6% 0.3% 1.2% 0.1% 1.8% 3.7%
1308 Northwest Clackamas County 89.9% 0.8% 0.6% 3.8% 0.1% 1.3% 3.6%
1309 West Clackamas County 88.9% 1.2% 1.0% 4.4% 0.1% 1.4% 3.0%
1310 Tigard/Tualatin/Wilsonville 87.2% 1.0% 0.6% 4.3% 0.5% 3.7% 2.7%
1311 Hillsboro/Western Washington County 79.2% 1.4% 2.9% 5.8% 0.2% 7.7% 2.8%
1312 Aloha/West Beaverton 73.9% 2.1% 0.7% 15.0% 0.5% 2.8% 4.9%
1313 East and Central Beaverton 80.5% 1.5% 1.6% 7.2% 0.3% 5.5% 3.4%
2101 North Clark County 87.5% 1.4% 0.5% 4.8% 0.6% 2.3% 3.0%
2102 East Clark County 92.9% 0.7% 0.4% 2.4% 0.3% 1.2% 2.1%
2200 Vancouver 81.5% 2.7% 1.2% 4.8% 0.3% 4.1% 5.5%
ALL PDX 83.2% 2.9% 1.3% 5.7% 0.3% 3.1% 3.5%

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey. 2005-2007 PUMS data.

Table 6. Percentage Population by “Hispanic” and PUMA in the Portland-Vancouver MSA (Jump back)

PUMA Name Non-Hispanic Hispanic
1301 North/Northeast Portland 85.4% 14.6%
1302 Outer East Portland 88.4% 11.6%
1303 Southeast Portland 91.1% 8.9%
1304 West Portland 96.3% 3.7%
1305 Central East Portland 94.5% 5.5%
1306 Gresham/East Multnomah County 84.1% 15.9%
1307 East Clackamas County 95.0% 5.0%
1308 Northwest Clackamas County 91.9% 8.1%
1309 West Clackamas County 93.5% 6.5%
1310 Tigard/Tualatin/Wilsonville 87.9% 12.1%
1311 Hillsboro/Western Washington County 79.9% 20.1%
1312 Aloha/West Beaverton 90.9% 9.1%
1313 East and Central Beaverton 87.9% 12.1%
2101 North Clark County 95.0% 5.0%
2102 East Clark County 96.7% 3.3%
2200 Vancouver 90.8% 9.2%
ALL PDX 90.4% 9.7%

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey. 2005-2007 PUMS data.

Table 7. Distribution of Racial Populations in the Portland-Vancouver MSA (Jump back)

PUMA Name White Black Native American Asian Pacific Islander Other Race Two or More Races
1301 North/Northeast Portland 4.2% 25.1% 6.2% 2.7% 6.2% 5.4% 8.7%
1302 Outer East Portland 4.8% 16.1% 14.1% 9.7% 8.5% 6.1% 6.5%
1303 Southeast Portland 5.1% 4.0% 4.2% 6.9% 12.9% 4.5% 5.8%
1304 West Portland 6.1% 4.7% 2.8% 5.0% 0.3% 2.9% 3.1%
1305 Central East Portland 5.4% 10.0% 1.6% 5.5% 5.5% 3.1% 4.8%
1306 Gresham/East Multnomah County 6.6% 8.9% 17.7% 6.7% 6.6% 7.7% 4.9%
1307 East Clackamas County 6.3% 1.2% 1.3% 1.2% 2.1% 3.3% 6.0%
1308 Northwest Clackamas County 7.2% 1.9% 3.3% 4.5% 1.1% 2.7% 6.8%
1309 West Clackamas County 6.7% 2.5% 4.9% 4.8% 2.7% 2.9% 5.4%
1310 Tigard/Tualatin/Wilsonville 7.0% 2.3% 3.1% 5.0% 10.3% 7.9% 5.1%
1311 Hillsboro/Western Washington County 7.9% 3.9% 18.5% 8.4% 5.6% 20.6% 6.7%
1312 Aloha/West Beaverton 6.0% 4.9% 3.7% 18.0% 10.4% 6.1% 9.6%
1313 East and Central Beaverton 5.2% 2.8% 6.7% 6.8% 4.9% 9.5% 5.2%
2101 North Clark County 6.3% 2.9% 2.4% 5.1% 10.1% 4.4% 5.1%
2102 East Clark County 7.5% 1.6% 2.2% 2.8% 5.2% 2.6% 4.0%
2200 Vancouver 7.8% 7.3% 7.4% 6.8% 7.6% 10.4% 12.5%
SUM 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey. 2005-2007 PUMS data.

Table 8. Percent of Persons Speaking Various Languages in the Portland-Vancouver MSA (Jump back)

PUMA Name English Spanish Other
Indo-
European
language
Asian or
Pacific
Islander
Other
1301 North/Northeast Portland 80.8% 11.7% 4.3% 1.9% 1.3%
1302 Outer East Portland 76.8% 8.8% 7.0% 7.0% 0.4%
1303 Southeast Portland 80.6% 7.1% 5.5% 5.9% 0.9%
1304 West Portland 85.5% 4.5% 5.4% 3.4% 1.1%
1305 Central East Portland 85.3% 4.5% 5.4% 3.6% 1.3%
1306 Gresham/East Multnomah County 80.7% 10.2% 4.0% 4.2% 1.0%
1307 East Clackamas County 90.7% 4.8% 3.1% 1.4% 0.1%
1308 Northwest Clackamas County 86.0% 6.7% 3.7% 3.2% 0.4%
1309 West Clackamas County 86.8% 5.5% 4.2% 3.3% 0.3%
1310 Tigard/Tualatin/Wilsonville 82.9% 8.8% 4.1% 3.3% 1.0%
1311 Hillsboro/Western Washington County 78.5% 14.6% 2.2% 4.4% 0.3%
1312 Aloha/West Beaverton 74.4% 6.5% 7.3% 10.6% 1.3%
1313 East and Central Beaverton 81.1% 8.3% 4.4% 5.7% 0.6%
2101 North Clark County 84.4% 4.4% 6.5% 4.2% 0.5%
2102 East Clark County 89.6% 2.6% 4.8% 2.4% 0.6%
2200 Vancouver 84.3% 6.4% 5.6% 3.4% 0.3%
All PDX 83.0% 7.3% 4.8% 4.2% 0.7%

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey. 2005-2007 PUMS data.

Table 9. Median Household Income by PUMA (Jump back)

PUMA Name Median Household Income
1301 North/Northeast Portland $46,825
1302 Outer East Portland $43,500
1303 Southeast Portland $42,844
1304 West Portland $58,886
1305 Central East Portland $49,613
1306 Gresham/East Multnomah County $48,412
1307 East Clackamas County $62,669
1308 Northwest Clackamas County $53,791
1309 West Clackamas County $73,218
1310 Tigard/Tualatin/Wilsonville $65,494
1311 Hillsboro/Western Washington County $60,623
1312 Aloha/West Beaverton $66,442
1313 East and Central Beaverton $61,159
2101 North Clark County $61,100
2102 East Clark County $62,964
2200 Vancouver $46,790
All PDX $56,288

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey. 2005-2007 PUMS data.

Table 10. Percent Age 25 with BA (Jump back)

PUMA Name Percent Age 25 with BA
1301 North/Northeast Portland 32.1%
1302 Outer East Portland 16.3%
1303 Southeast Portland 33.1%
1304 West Portland 60.4%
1305 Central East Portland 47.7%
1306 Gresham/East Multnomah County 19.3%
1307 East Clackamas County 20.6%
1308 Northwest Clackamas County 23.2%
1309 West Clackamas County 45.7%
1310 Tigard/Tualatin/Wilsonville 37.0%
1311 Hillsboro/Western Washington County 28.1%
1312 Aloha/West Beaverton 42.3%
1313 East and Central Beaverton 44.8%
2101 North Clark County 24.4%
2102 East Clark County 24.9%
2200 Vancouver 25.1%
All PDX 32.0%

Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey. 2005-2007 PUMS data.

Footnotes

  1. Note that in the map the colored areas are covered by the PUMAs we will analyze, while the white areas are covered by PUMAs that extend well outside the MSA definition and are not included in our analysis. (↩)
  2. Note that the borders have been cut in order to show the central and populated areas in more detail. (↩)
  3. The Census reports the one-year and three-year ACS data only to the detail of this geography in order to maintain the privacy of survey respondents and to improve the precision of the estimates. (↩)
  4. The information shown is available for all PUMAs in this case, but for the sake of space, we will just focus on a few. (↩)
  5. “A household includes all the persons who occupy a housing unit. A housing unit is a house, an apartment, a mobile home, a group of rooms, or a single room that is occupied (or if vacant, is intended for occupancy) as separate living quarters. Separate living quarters are those in which the occupants live and eat separately from any other persons in the building and which have direct access from the outside of the building or through a common hall. The occupants may be a single family, one person living alone, two or more families living together, or any other group of related or unrelated persons who share living arrangements. (People not living in households are classified as living in group quarters.)” (Census 2008 (↩)
  6. “Family” is a similar concept, but with kinship added; this article assumes that household numbers are about the same as family numbers since households are much easier to define and report and are the basis for ACS sampling, we only use households in our analysis. (↩)
  7. The ACS is used only for proportions and ratios at the subregional geographic level. It is incomplete in many respects, but it is still the timeliest demographic data available; see Hough (2006) for an analysis of some shortcomings of the ACS. In some cases, similar statistics have been tabulated by the Census Bureau and are available through its American FactFinder website (http://factfinder.census.gov); these tabulations may be slightly different from ours. (↩)
  8. At this scale, some variations get smoothed because heterogeneous populations are averaged together. These variations would be apparent at smaller geographies like census tracts and block groups. (↩)